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Emeritus

G. Michael ClarkG. Michael Clark

Associate Professor
Surficial Geology and Geomorphology

Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences
1412 Circle Drive
Knoxville, TN 37996-1410


Already well into my doctoral dissertation research on structural geomorphology involving bedrock mapping for the West Virginia Geological and Economic Survey, I was introduced to Appalachian regolith as a viable field of research by Professor Anders Rapp of Uppsala University in Sweden who came to the Department of Geography at Penn State as a visiting professor. After completing my dissertation in Geological Sciences on the origins of wind and water gaps through the Wills Mountain Anticlinorium in Mineral and Grant Counties, West Virginia, I received a Thord-Gray Postdoctoral Research Fellowship for study in Uppsala University, again under the tutelage of Professor Anders Rapp. Our work in Swedish Lapland, in part with Professor Sidney E. White, of Ohio State University, Columbus, produced papers in Geografiska Annaler on nonsorted polygons and palsas. Here in the Department of Geological Sciences, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, I have received research grants and published on central and southern Appalachian regolith topics, and lately, with colleagues in the Department of Geography on regoliths in the Cordillera Central, Dominican Republic, Hispaniola. I am sole author or lead author of three invited book chapters in the Binghamton Symposia in Geomorphology Series, on the topics of cataclysmic flooding, water and wind gap origins, and periglacial geomorphology in the Central and Southern Appalachians. Since its inception in 1987, I have been active in The Southeastern Friends of the Pleistocene, missing only the September, 1991, meeting on the geomorphology and plant ecology of the Shenandoah Valley, and the 2001 meeting on the geomorphology of the Appalachian Great Valley in southeastern Pennsylvania.

  • Clark, G. M., and Kite, J. S., 2000, An introduction to some recent advances in regolith research in the Appalachians beyond the Late Wisconsinan glacial borders: Southeastern Geology, v. 39, nos. 3-4, p. 107-116.
  • Horn, S. P., Orvis, K. H., Kennedy, L. M., and Clark, G. M., 2000, Prehistoric Fires in the Highlands of the Dominican Republic: Evidence from Charcoal in Soils and Sediments: Journal of Caribbean Research, v.36, nos. 1-2, p. 10-18.
  • Horn, S. P., Orvis, K. H., Kennedy, L. M., and Clark, G. M., 2000, Prehistoric fires in the Highlands of the Dominican Republic: Evidence from charcoal in soils and sediments: Caribbean Journal of Science, v. 36, nos. 1-2, p. 10-18.
  • Clark, G. M., and Kite, J. S., 2000, An introduction to some recent advances in regolith research in the Appalachians beyond the Late Wisconsinan glacial border: Southeastern Geology, v. 39, nos. 3-4, p. 107-116.
  • Clark, G. M., Horn, S. P., and Orvis, K. H., 2002, High-Elevation Savanna Landscapes in the Cordillera Central, Dominican Republic, Hispaniola: Mountain Research and Development, v. 22, no. 3, p. 288-295.

 


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